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Tennis Elbow (Lateral epicondylitis)


Tips for tennis elbow

Tennis elbow is a condition that causes pain and inflammation in the elbow and forearm. It is typically caused by overuse of the muscles and tendons in the forearm that attach to the elbow.


Here are some tips that may help alleviate the symptoms of tennis elbow:

Rest: Give your elbow a break and avoid activities that cause pain.

Ice: Apply ice to your elbow for 15-20 minutes at a time, several times a day to reduce inflammation.

Compression: Wrap your elbow with a compression bandage to help reduce swelling.


Elevation: Keep your elbow elevated to help reduce swelling.

Pain relief: Over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen can help alleviate pain.

Stretching and strengthening exercises: Consult with a physical therapist or doctor about specific exercises that can help stretch and strengthen the muscles in your forearm.


Bracing: Wearing a brace or splint can help support your elbow and reduce strain on the affected tendons.


Modify your activity: Modify your activity or technique to reduce the strain on your elbow. For example, using a larger grip size on your racket or changing your golf swing.


Seek medical attention: If the pain persists or gets worse, consult with a doctor or physical therapist for further evaluation and treatment options.


What is tennnis elbow?

Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis, is a condition that causes pain and inflammation in the elbow and forearm. It is typically caused by overuse of the muscles and tendons in the forearm that attach to the elbow, which can result in small tears in the tendon. Tennis elbow got its name because it is commonly associated with the repetitive motion and strain of tennis, but it can occur in anyone who performs activities that involve gripping or twisting motions of the wrist and arm. Symptoms of tennis elbow include pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow, weakness in the forearm, and difficulty gripping objects. Treatment may include rest, ice, compression, stretching and strengthening exercises, pain medication, bracing, or in severe cases, surgery.



Causes of tennis elbow

Tennis elbow is typically caused by overuse of the muscles and tendons in the forearm that attach to the elbow. Here are some common causes of tennis elbow:


Repetitive gripping and twisting motions: Tennis elbow is often associated with activities that involve repetitive gripping and twisting motions of the wrist and arm, such as playing tennis, golfing, typing, or using hand tools.Improper technique: Poor form or technique when performing activities that involve repetitive gripping and twisting motions can put added strain on the tendons in the forearm and increase the risk of developing tennis elbow.


Muscle imbalances: Weakness or imbalances in the muscles of the forearm and upper arm can also contribute to the development of tennis elbow.

Age: As people age, tendons in the elbow can become weaker and less able to handle the stresses of repetitive activities, making them more susceptible to developing tennis elbow.


Previous injury: A previous injury to the elbow, wrist, or forearm can increase the risk of developing tennis elbow.


Certain occupations: People who work in jobs that involve repetitive gripping and twisting motions, such as construction workers or plumbers, may be at higher risk of developing tennis elbow.It's important to note that while these factors can increase the risk of developing tennis elbow, the condition can occur in anyone who performs activities that involve repetitive gripping and twisting motions of the wrist and arm.


Exercises for tennis elbow aim to stretch and strengthen the muscles and tendons in the forearm, improve range of motion, and reduce pain and inflammation. Here are some common exercises for tennis elbow:


Wrist extensor stretch: Hold your arm straight out in front of you with your palm facing down. Use your other hand to gently bend your wrist back, holding for 15-30 seconds. Repeat on the other arm.


Wrist flexor stretch: Hold your arm straight out in front of you with your palm facing up. Use your other hand to gently bend your wrist down, holding for 15-30 seconds. Repeat on the other arm.


Forearm pronation and supination: Hold a small weight or a can of food in your hand with your elbow bent at a 90-degree angle. Rotate your wrist so that your palm faces up, then down. Repeat for 10-15 repetitions on each arm.


Eccentric wrist curls: Hold a light weight in your hand with your palm facing down. Use your other hand to help lift the weight up, then slowly lower the weight


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